Wave Rock

As noted in earlier posts (most especially the post on Standley Chasm), much of what you see in Australia, as far as landforms are concerned, has been formed by erosion. From the sea-battered coastlines to the rain- and wind-sculpted interior, this place is paradise for those who like nature-carved rocks.

Near Perth, I had the opportunity to wander through the crystalline wonderlands of extensive underground caves and visit fascinating formations a bit farther out of town. One day, I booked myself on what was billed as the longest day tour in Australia—the 430-mile round-trip drive that took me out to Wave Rock.

The whole day was a delight, and not just because of Wave Rock. We saw amazing wildflowers (often stopping for photographs), flocks of cockatoos, farms, and charming towns. We also learned an immense amount of Aboriginal lore and tales of Australia’s past. So the transit time was well spent.

The 47-foot-high, 300-foot-long granite “wave” that is Wave Rock (pictured below, on the left) is the superstar rock formation in the area that was our destination, but there were numerous other formations nearby that were, though less stunning, still fascinating. Among those, I was particularly amused by one called the Hippo’s Yawn (at right, below), because it really did look like quite a bit like the open mouth of a yawning hippo.

Wave Rock

Wave Rock

Hippo's Yawn

Hippo's Yawn

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1 Comment

Filed under Australia, Book, Geography, Nature, Travel

One response to “Wave Rock

  1. Those are amazing. Never seen nothing like that. Forty-seven feet high is kind of scary height tall.

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